Saint Roch and the Art of the Camino (#CaminoTuesday)

I’m going to keep it short this week, because we’re diving into holiday planning, and there’s not much time or attention this week for anything that’s not a gift or a baked good. But here it is, #CaminoTuesday again, and the assigned theme is “Favorite Camino Art.” Which, I confess, threw me into a bit … More Saint Roch and the Art of the Camino (#CaminoTuesday)

Almost Wordless Wednesday: Holloways

If you’ve walked the Camino de Santiago, you’ve likely encountered a holloway, though you may not know it. According to Atlas Obscura: “Appearing like trenches dragged into the earth, sunken lanes, also called hollow-ways or holloways, are centuries-old thoroughfares worn down by the traffic of time. They’re one of the few examples of human-made infrastructure … More Almost Wordless Wednesday: Holloways

The International Women

Happy International Women’s Day! I woke up this morning to discover that it’s International Women’s Day, the day when we honor the movement for women’s rights around the world and celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievement of women. Of course, for me there’s no more noteworthy achievement than a pilgrimage. And no group … More The International Women

Is There a New American Pilgrimage Trail?

A few years ago, if you’d asked me about pilgrimages, I would have had to dig back into history. The word pilgrimage seemed archaic, more appropriate for Chaucer than the twenty-first century, and carrying a backpack for days wasn’t my thing. After I fell in love with the Camino de Santiago, though, the Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon* … More Is There a New American Pilgrimage Trail?

Cows of the Camino

When our thousand-mile Camino trek ended, Eric and I took a train east, from Santiago to Irun. The hills of Galicia and then the plains of the Meseta sped by in a blur of landscapes without details. This was the only way I’d seen the world for years, I realized, from moving metal boxes that … More Cows of the Camino